Majority Oppose Sending Combat Troops to Mali

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According to Chairman Allan Gregg; “While Canadians believe Canada has a role to play in the world - even in parts of the world where a direct, vested interest might not be readily apparent - few see that role as a military one. The notion that Canadians are "peacekeepers" and moral leaders - as opposed to a combat nation - seems to run very deep and clearly applies to the current conflict in Mali".

 

 

A majority of respondents are aware of the situation in Mali.

  • Nationally, 58% are very (19%) or somewhat (39%) aware of the conflict currently underway in Mali.  Regionally, residents of BC and Ontario are more likely than those elsewhere to be aware of the situation in Mali.  Those over the age of 50, men, and those with household incomes exceeding $60k/year are more likely than their
    counterparts to be aware of the situation in Mali.  Supporters of the Green Party and BQ are less likely than Conservatives, Liberals and New Democrats to be aware of the situation in Mali.
     

A strong majority feel that any Canadian commitment to Mali should NOT involve combat troops.

  • One in three (34%) say Canada should offer humanitarian aid but no military involvement.
  • Just over one in four (28%) feel Canada should offer military support but only in the form of non-combat trainers, equipment and support personnel.
  • Just over one in ten (12%) feel Canada should send in armed troops to combat the jihadists but only for a limited and defined period of time.
  • Less than one in ten (7%) believe Canada should send in armed troops to combat the jihadists for as long as it takes.
  • Roughly one in ten (11%) feel Canada should not get involved in Mali at all.

Few demographic groups feel Canada should be sending troops to Mali.

  • In no region did more than 22% suggest Canada should send combat troops to Mali.
  • Only among Conservative voters (27%) did more than one in four respondents feel Canada should have combat troops in Mali.

A plurality feel Canada should offer humanitarian aid to Mali, but no military involvement.

  • Women (39%) are more likely than men (29%) to support sending humanitarian aid to Mali.
  • Conservatives are less likely than other voting groups to support sending humanitarian aid to Mali.

The idea of sending non-combat military support to Mali enjoys some resonance with Canadians.

  • Men (32%) are more likely than women (23%) to support sending noncombat military support to Mali.
  • Supporters of the Bloc Quebecois are less likely than other voters to support sending non-combat military aid to Mali.

Few think Canada should have no involvement at all in Mali

  • Those over the age of 55 are more likely than those under the age of 35 to say Canada should not get involved in Mali at all.
  • Those with household incomes below $40k/year are more likely than other income groups to feel Canada should stay out of the conflict in Mali entirely.

Each week, Harris/Decima interviews just over 1000 Canadians through teleVox, the company’s national telephone omnibus survey. The most recent data were gathered between January 31 and February 4, 2013 for 1,015 completes. A sample of the same size has a margin of error of +/-3.1% 19
times out of 20.