Majority See Wynne’s Victory as a Breakthrough

Download Release

Almost seven in ten see Kathleen Wynne’s victory as a significant breakthrough for women in politics. Nationally, 69% express this view, including 31% who feel it is a very significant breakthrough. A further 17% feel it is ‘not that significant’ and 11% feel it is ‘not at all significant’.

  • Women, residents of Atlantic Canada and Quebec, and those under the age of 35 are most likely to view Ms. Wynne’s victory as at least a significant breakthrough.
     

Women are seen as being represented well in politics, while a majority feels Aboriginals are not represented well.

  • Fully 76% of Canadians feel women are represented well in politics, while 21% feel women are not represented well in politics. Men (83%) are more likely than women (69%) to say women are represented well in politics. Additionally, Conservatives are more likely than other voting groups to feel women are well represented in politics.
  • Almost six in ten (58%) feel visible minorities are well represented in politics, while 36% feel visible minorities are not well represented in politics. Residents of Quebec are less likely than others to feel visible minorities are well represented in politics; while men are more likely than women to feel visible minorities are well represented in politics.
  • A majority (57%) feel religious Canadians are well represented in Canadian politics, while 26% feel they are not represented well. Men, those under the age of 25, and New Democrats are most likely to feel religious Canadians are represented well in politics.
  • More than four in ten Canadians (44%) feel gays and lesbians are well represented in politics, while 41% feel gays and lesbians are not well represented in politics. Residents of BC are most likely to say gays and lesbians are well represented in politics, while supporters of the NDP are less likely to say so. In fact, a majority of New Democrats (54%) feel gays and lesbians are not well represented in politics.
  • Fewer than four in ten (37%) feel Aboriginals are represented well in politics. A majority (57%) feel Aboriginals are not represented well in politics. Residents of Ontario and Quebec are much less likely than others to feel Aboriginals are well represented in politics. Conservatives and Liberals are more likely than other voting groups to feel Aboriginals are well represented in politics.

Each week, Harris/Decima interviews just over 1000 Canadians through teleVox, the company’s national telephone omnibus survey. The most recent data were gathered between January 31 and February 4, 2013 for 1,015 completes. A sample of the same size has a margin of error of 3.1%, 19 times out of 20.